I Do It So It Feels Like Hell

Team Members Ariana Silvan-Grau Anna Gelman Zoë DePreta I Do It So It Feels Like Hell is an exploration of writing, mental illness, womanhood, and the disconnect between artist and art, demonstrated through the life and works of poet and novelist Sylvia Plath. Through Plath’s undeniably personal work, the piece will question what it means to be an artist and a woman, and what it means to be as famous for your suicide as for your work. XARTS Fund Recipient, Fall...
Meditation on Media in Oberlin and London

Meditation on Media in Oberlin and London

Team Members Christiana Rose “Meditation on Media in Oberlin and London” is an interactive installation that will investigate the impact of cross-disciplinary media in two distinct locations, Oberlin and London, rural and metropolitan, on collective social and political change. It will challenge and ask participants to consider the political and social power of media. XARTS Fund Recipient, Fall...

Fin

Team Members   Kirk Pearson Patrick Gilfether Every day, hundreds of tuna are captured off the coast of Indonesia. Within just 72 hours, they are chilled, packaged, shipped, processed, auctioned, prepared, and served 3,500 miles away— in Tokyo. This January, we will be sailing through the coastal waters of Banda Aceh, catching a flight with a fish across the Pacific ocean, basking in the salty air of the Tsukiji tuna market, and joining a dinner at a well-lit sushi restaurant: tracking a single tuna from Sumatran sea to Japanese metropolis. Through film, composition, sound design, and computer programming, Fin is an interactive multimedia piece that tells the story of our planet’s incredible, yet seldom considered, network of food manufacturing. From the home of an Acehnese fishermen to the tungsten glow of a Tokyo restaurant, each frame of the process will be filmed as a cinematic portrait using parallel camera movements and blocking. These narratives will then be recombined into a unique filmic interactive called an “exquisite corpse.” As the viewer watches the film, they will be able to switch between the heads, bodies, and legs of each character. The audience will literally have the power to superimpose the diner with the cargo merchant, or the chef with the boat captain. It will manifest the many characters directly responsible for our food, drawing attention to their interconnectedness and fluidity. Fin seeks to tell the story of a single piece of sashimi from both global and individual perspectives. In offering the opportunity to arrive at personal narratives, we ask viewers to disentangle the net of industry in order to see more...