Fin

Team Members   Kirk Pearson Patrick Gilfether Every day, hundreds of tuna are captured off the coast of Indonesia. Within just 72 hours, they are chilled, packaged, shipped, processed, auctioned, prepared, and served 3,500 miles away— in Tokyo. This January, we will be sailing through the coastal waters of Banda Aceh, catching a flight with a fish across the Pacific ocean, basking in the salty air of the Tsukiji tuna market, and joining a dinner at a well-lit sushi restaurant: tracking a single tuna from Sumatran sea to Japanese metropolis. Through film, composition, sound design, and computer programming, Fin is an interactive multimedia piece that tells the story of our planet’s incredible, yet seldom considered, network of food manufacturing. From the home of an Acehnese fishermen to the tungsten glow of a Tokyo restaurant, each frame of the process will be filmed as a cinematic portrait using parallel camera movements and blocking. These narratives will then be recombined into a unique filmic interactive called an “exquisite corpse.” As the viewer watches the film, they will be able to switch between the heads, bodies, and legs of each character. The audience will literally have the power to superimpose the diner with the cargo merchant, or the chef with the boat captain. It will manifest the many characters directly responsible for our food, drawing attention to their interconnectedness and fluidity. Fin seeks to tell the story of a single piece of sashimi from both global and individual perspectives. In offering the opportunity to arrive at personal narratives, we ask viewers to disentangle the net of industry in order to see more...

Sea Change

Team Members   Kirk Pearson Patrick Gilfether The Strait of Malacca is the capillary of modern Earth. Every year, over half the world’s merchant fleet, half the world’s oil, and over 40% of global commerce pass through this narrow passage. For centuries, this sliver of ocean has captivated navigators, offering the most direct route between India and China, and a vast constellation of cultural exchange. To keep your head above water, however, is only half the story. Just underneath this massive web of global trade lies an even larger system— that of the Indonesian Coral Triangle. With over 75% of the world’s coral and 40% of the world’s reef fish, this ecosystem is widely considered to be the center of global marine biodiversity— just feet away from the largest physical network in human history. Our project is an interactive multimedia piece about these two incredible systems. For the month of January, we will live aboard the Pelni ferry (known as “the Indonesian Bridge”) and chronicle our experience as we personally sail one of the world’s most highly-trafficked waterways. Aboard the 1,300 mile odyssey from Medan to Jakarta, we will be recording 360-degree video and binaural audio: two state-of-the-art technologies that will impart an incredibly realistic experience for our viewers. We’ll be capturing original audio and video of the journey, the people aboard the vessel, and the industries that interact with the channel. The footage of the Coral Triangle will also be original, recorded on an extensive Scuba voyage using specialized underwater equipment. What makes our project truly groundbreaking, however, is its element of interactivity. We are personally inventing a...
ShuttleHome

ShuttleHome

Team Members Dean Ginsberg Co-Founder ShuttleHome is a coach bus service that provides students and faculty with convenient, comfortable, and affordable transportation to major cities during school breaks. Every year students pay thousands of dollars to fly home with strangers — we allow them to save that money and enjoy a safe travel experience that connects them with their classmates. Check out our website at...
BinStored

BinStored

Team Members Dean Ginsberg Co-Founder Finals week is a hectic time of year in the oasis that is Oberlin College. Students are usually slammed with papers and tests, and they’re emotional about losing their 4th and 5th year classmates to the abyss that is the “real-world”. On top of all of that, somewhere way in the back of their head, they’re panicking because they no idea how they are going to get all of their stuff out of their dorm before ResEd kicks them out the morning after their last final. This is where BinStored comes in: BinStored takes care of all of the students’ summer storage needs, because, simply put, finals period is for studying. Here’s how it works: Students register online at www.binstored.com During finals week we set up a drop off station outside of their dorm room where they can pick up five storage bins at no cost with no commitment. Why five bins? Because figuring out how many bins you need for your room is kind of like figuring out how many diapers you need for your baby — long story short, it’s always best to have some extras. Once the students are packed up they bring their bin to the conveniently located drop off station. They are charged for the bins that they used and we put them on the truck for storage. They’re stuff is stored in our off campus storage facility for the summer and returned to their new dorm in the fall. After going through LaunchU last January, this summer was BinStored’s first year in operation. We launched at Oberlin and...